Post-PC Digital Teams

Simon  Mathews

October 24, 2013

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Mark Ryan, Chief Analytics Officer of Extractable, and I were recently interviewed by Sam Stern, a Senior CX Analyst from Forrester for his new report "Digital Customer Experience Teams in the Post-PC Era" and I wanted to share a few thoughts on the topics raised.

Sam's report looks at how companies are trying to shape their digital teams against an environment in which customers are moving between devices (PCs, phones, tablets) and channels in a very fluid manner, and demanding a consistent and functional experience across them all.

We had a great conversation, sharing anecdotes and strategies from our clients, comparing our thoughts against what Sam was hearing from others during his research.

There were many observations and opportunities that we shared with Sam, based on what we have been seeing with our clients and engagements over the last few years, but two major insights stood out that I wanted to discuss in more depth today:

#1 - The external / internal cycle

As we know, larger organizations find it hard to change quickly, and this is especially true when confronted with new technology that not just challenges the current way that business is done, but also requires new skills or ways of thinking to take advantage of the technology. So, what we often see is the creation of a new group or team, outside of the standard organization, with a remit to take advantage of the new technology. We saw it with the 'web team' in the past, and to a lesser extent with SEO and social media in more recent years.

Over time, as the technology becomes mainstream, the external team is absorbed back into the organization, changing it in the process.

Today, we are seeing some clients and organizations with 'mobile teams' as a reaction to the rapid growth of the new, post-pc multi-device world we are now in. However, it makes no sense to have a separate mobile team, as mobile devices are just one touch point that customers have with an organization. Of course, certain key mobile skills are needed to fully utilize mobile platforms, but that should be delivered within the context of the total customer experience.

One good question to ask of anyone proposing a separate team focused on mobile is: "If a social media tool is delivered to the customer via a mobile device, is that the responsibility of the mobile or social teams?"

The takeaway: Focus on the total customer journey and not the specific delivery device.

#2 - The business is the experience

In his report Sam talks about the importance of getting business stakeholders involved in the customer experience design process and how customer journey mapping can be a good tool to aide in that process.

We strongly agree.

With one of our clients in the financial services industry we are working on a major overhaul of the client's b2b broker portal. The project's business stakeholders deeply understand their business but are new to the customer experience design world. Consequently it is proving hard for them to clearly express experience requirements and give feedback on the more advanced interactions being contemplated.

Just last week during a call to review some wireframe concepts, one stakeholder asked a question, "I understand how the navigation is supposed to work, but how will our users interact with the menu on the left?" The menu on the left was just our index of the screens we were showing in the session, not part of the design, indicating a lack of familiarity with the process we live by every day. However it is our responsibility, as experience designers, to ensure those stakeholders are part of the success of the new experience not the other way round.

Journey mapping is one tool to help with this, allowing stakeholders to see the total customer journey and where digital can assist customers.

Customer Journey Workshop

(In progress Journey Mapping exercise)

Another technique we are using much more frequently is to put higher-fidelity concepts in front of stakeholders so we can gauge their reactions earlier in the process. Once they see how principles that sometimes seem esoteric come alive in a 'real' experience, it's much easier for them to express valuable feedback.

Combining the customer journey maps with interactive concepts at key touch points can become a powerful tool to evangelize an organization behind digital change.

How has your digital team changed? Do you see big changes in the future?

And, thanks to Sam Stern for helping to drive an ecosystem-wide approach to building digital customer experience teams.